See your patients with greater clarity in 2020 with Digatherm’s industry-first,
veterinary-specific digital thermal imaging system.

You’re good at observing your patients and evaluating them with vital signs and comprehensive examinations. You’re good at listening to client observations and complaints. But owners often don’t notice or remember symptoms that show up at home. And there is much your patients don’t show you and can’t tell you.

Make Digatherm your new technology in 2020 and see your patients more clearly

Thermal images are a visual representation of the surface body temperatures of a patient and give physiological information about what is going on below the surface. Increased temperatures (hyperthermia) may indicate inflammation, infection, or malignancy. Decreased temperatures (hypothermia) may indicate atrophy or neurological dysfunction.

Thermal images give you a roadmap that localizes and pinpoints problems. With a clearer picture of your patient’s problems, you can more accurately plan diagnostics and therapeutics, and communicate with owners why you need to go in the direction you recommend.

Once a therapeutic plan is established, thermal images give clear, objective information that helps monitor patient response to therapy. Use the images to demonstrate that a patient is responding and help maintain client compliance with the therapeutic program. Or, if the images indicate a patient is not responding, use the images to help the client understand your recommended changes to the patient’s care.

Since thermal images are digital, they are easily captured and evaluated with Digatherm’s hand-held portable system. Images can easily be shared on the Digatherm system or any room-sized digital screen, remotely printed, or shared by email.

Thermal Image of a racing dog
Dorsal thermal image of the shoulders and thorax of a 6-year old retired racing greyhound.

This patient presented with a history of persistent lameness of the forelimbs. The image shows abnormal hyperthermia over the shoulders and scapular region with higher temperatures over the left scapula and periscapular muscles. This image indicated the need for further imaging of the shoulders. Subsequent radiographs showed a possible OCD lesion in right shoulder and an enthesiophyte associated with the left scapular acromion.

Thermal image courtesy of Lauren Bueter, RVT, Middlebury Animal Clinic, Middlebury, IN

To learn how you can see 20/20 in 2020 with Digatherm, use the link below to schedule an in-office demo.

Schedule a Demo

Before Digatherm’s technology was available to see your patient’s more clearly, it was used by NASA and the International Space Station. To learn more about the technology behind Digatherm’s industry leading thermal imaging system, join Digatherm for a webinar: Veterinary Medical Thermal Imaging for 2020 – What and how? on December 17th at 8 pm EST.

Reserve you space for the webinar

Register Now