What’s love got to do with it? Everything!

That may be a sweet old-fashioned notion, but veterinarians do love their patients, and owners do love their pets. Through the touch of our hands we make their lives better.

Love them even more by learning more about their health. Thermal images take pet exams to a new level. Body surface temperatures reflect what is going on below the surface. Since pets can’t point out where their problems are located, thermal images give veterinarians and pet owners better insight about pets’ physiology, as well as a road map for diagnostics and therapy.

Images are taken during the pet’s examination. The thermal camera is no-touch and non-invasive. With several clicks of the camera, veterinarians get real-time physiological information about patients, and then can share the images with owners so they too can see, understand, and be more involved with their pet’s care.

The anterior to posterior forelimb image shows hypothermia over the cranio-lateral aspect of the right distal antebrachium and carpus. The dorsal image shows hyperthermia over the left dorsal epaxial muscles. The thermal orthostatic analysis shows weight shifting to the forelegs and the left side.

This patient is a 5-year-old neutered male mixed-breed pit bull that presented with no musculoskeletal abnormalities other than a straight-legged rear-leg gait.

The images indicate physiological changes, most likely due to abnormal stance and weight distribution, and are an indication of the need for further diagnostics and early intervention.

Thermal images courtesy of Stephanie Schlachter, DVM, WestMEC Veterinary Science NE, Phoenix, AZ.

To learn how you can love pets even more with Digatherm’s thermal imaging system,
use the link below to schedule an in-office demo.